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Lawmakers seek roadmap for ride-hailing regulation

COVER: Texas lawmakers are poised to discuss statewide regulations for ride-hailing companies next session, although there’s no clear consensus on what rules, if any, should be proposed come January. PHOTO by STALE GRUT VIA FLICKR

by MADLIN MEKELBURG

AUSTIN — Several state legislators have made it clear they’re eager to take control of rules for ride-hailing companies in Texas, shifting power from individual cities to the state. But with six months until the next legislative session, there’s no clear consensus on how exactly to go about it.

The Legislature has tried before — and failed — to come up with statewide regulations sought by industry heavyweights Uber and Lyft to free them from conflicting local rules.

But the recent decision by voters in Austin — the conservative state’s liberal capital — to reject rules sought by the ride-hailing giants has been a rallying cry for lawmakers.

“We don’t live in a democracy,” said. Sen. Don Huffines, R-Dallas. “All the authority cities have comes from the Legislature. They exist by the mercy of the Legislature. So we have a distinct role in overseeing all political subdivisions that we create, and we’ve got to make sure that they don’t trample economic liberty, personal liberty and freedoms.”

After the Austin election, Huffines immediately called for state regulations, or what he called “deregulations,” and was unconcerned with overriding the will of local voters.

“People get riled up, and they pick up their pitchforks and they run to the ballot box or they run to the barn and tar and feather or lynch someone,” he said. “We have rules of law relating to protecting the views of the minority.”

Huffines wasn’t the only state legislator whose ears perked up at news that Austin voters upheld city rules for ride-hailing companies over those backed by Uber and Lyft. His Senate colleague, Georgetown Republican Charles Schwertner, also pledged to draft legislation.

“We’re exploring all options,” Schwertner said. “There’s the background check and then there’s fingerprinting, those are two separate issues. There’s competing discussions … I personally have not made any decisions as to what is the best statutory language to put in the bill.”

At issue in Austin was the city council’s requirement that drivers undergo fingerprint-based background checks. So far, lawmakers in favor of statewide regulation have been mum on whether their legislation will include the requirement. Sen. Robert Nichols, chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee, was unavailable for comment, but in January he told Quorum Report that fingerprinting should be included in statewide rules.

“As long as we’ve got fingerprinting in there, I think we could sell it,” he said of potential regulations.