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SUBMITTED REPORT

Finance director Steve Parker has been promoted to assistant city manager, San Marcos City Hall officials announced on Friday.

Parker

Parker, who has led the finance department since 2008, will continue in the capacity of finance director as he takes on added duties to assist City Manager Jim Nuse in the oversight of financial matters, economic development, contracts and financial negotiations.

“’Sound Finances’ has been the top strategic initiative adopted by the City Council in the past two years,” Nuse said. “Steve’s leadership and experience and the hard work of his team have contributed immeasurably to the City’s achievement of this goal, even during periods of economic challenges.”

Parker joins Collette Jamison as an assistant city manager in Nuse’s administration. Jamison has held the position since 2007.

“I am very excited to be given this opportunity,” Parker said. “I am proud to be part of strengthening our organization. San Marcos is a special place with a special workforce and citizenry. I look forward to the future.”

Parker joined the City of San Marcos in 1993 where he served as an accounting manager until 1997. He left for 10 years and worked as a manager in the Cost Services Division for MAXIMUS, Inc. the largest non-defense government consulting firm in the nation.

He returned to the City of San Marcos in 2007 as Assistant Finance Director, and served as interim director until he was named Finance Director in 2008.

A graduate of Texas State University Marcos with a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration, Parker is a member of the Certified Government Finance Officers Association. He is also a graduate of the Virginia Darden Business School Leaderships Program.

He is married to Wendy Parker and they have four children: Gage, Madison, Hannah and Hayden.

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55 thoughts on “Parker promoted to assistant city manager

  1. For all his ties to the City of San Marcos over the years – Mr. Parker does not live here. Do Assistant City Managers have to live in the City? I think that City Administrators would make better decisions that benefit the city if they were required to live within the city limits. That would immediately strengthen the middle class – one of the states goals of City Council for 2013.

  2. Wonder why it wasn’t mentioned in the report how long he has lived in San Marcos? Or where he does live?

  3. According to http://www.taxnetusa.com he is not listed as owning property in Hays County. According to his Facebook that I just checked, he lives in San Antonio. To be fair, maybe he plans to move now that he is the Assistant City Manager.

  4. On the other hand, requiring candidates to live in the city would likely limit the pool from which to select and/or drive up the price. I think it would be good to have our top management live inside the city but I’m opposed to it being a requirement.

  5. I think school district employees should also have to live within the boundaries of the SMCISD and maybe even the city limits of San Marcos. If the average income for a family of four in San Marcos is about $25,000, those individuals making over $70,000 (there are about 30 in the SMCISD) should also live, work, and contribute to the community that pays their salary.

  6. Has anyone checked on his salary for the past five years that he’s worked for the citizens of SM? One would think five years is enough time to find housing in SM.

  7. Good grief. I’m on board with believing our community would be stronger if all public servants lived here, but you don’t have to make it so personal.

  8. Well, if you want to get to the bottom of it, you could interview the parents who send their kids to Hill Country Christian, Wonderland, Masters and San Marcos Academy. Fix that and you’ve started to create a city where our executives want to live.

  9. The solution is very simple. Require that the employee, and their family, move within the confines of the governmental entity that they are employed by within a given time frame; six months to a year. Similar to the requirement for many governmental jobs that one gain certain certifications within a given time frame.

  10. Really doesn’t matter to me if he lives in New York City as long as the taxpayers of San Marcos aren’t paying his commuting expenses. But, it’s curious that his residence location wasn’t mentioned in the release. It seems that it usually is in some way with executive hires. Seems especially curious since they named his wife and children but left out their place of residence. Because it was obviously a deliberate omission it makes me wonder what other interesting fact or facts may have been omitted.

    Brad, here’s a chance to do some real reporting. No more copying from the Texas Tribune and reposting city of SM ‘submitted report’ press releases.

    Dig up the dirt on this guy. Or prove him as clean as a hounds tooth. Just give us the real facts.

  11. Can anyone say something here or is it just the haters have a say? City workers are extremely hard working people and dedicated to their jobs. Knowing Steve personaly and having worked with him many years, he is one of the nicest guys you would ever know and very good at what he does. City employees are paid to do a job. where they spend their salaries is their business. Being required to live within the city limits paying back their salaries in taxes would make the city into the “Company Store”

  12. In fairness, it should be noted that Collette Jamison doesn’t live in the City either. Tax rolls indicate that she lives in Guadalupe County and has lived there for quite a while. Mr. Jim Nuse DOES live in the city. Not sure what the policy/requirements of City Council is on residency. Anybody know?

  13. State law prohibits a city from requiring employees to live within the city limits. Other than limits for emergency responders, the obvious exception is when an employment contract stipulates that the employee establish and maintain residence within the city – such as the case of the city manager and city attorney. Unless the community wants to commit to contracts for the ACMs and department heads, then they (just like you and me) can live anywhere they like and everyone else can just go butt a stump.

  14. It’s possible Wendy Parker is required to live near her job. Or some other prevailing condition that precludes Steve from moving. The notion of eliminating great candidates because they can’t move to your city is absurd. It disgusts me that an article celebrating Mr. Parker’s achievement, and our good fortune to have him, has turned into a shark fest. You want to go check his salary for the past five years to see if, in your infinite wisdom, he could or should have moved into the city? Really? How embarrassing.

  15. From Wikipedia entry on MXIMUS Inc.
    Sorry, no time to verify details or look into it any further at the moment. But there’s more information….

    November 1997- The Hartford Courant reported that MAXIMUS “gets minimal results” when it was hired by the State of Connecticut to manage a child care program for recipients of welfare.[59] According to the Record-Journal, MAXIMUS “hired too few people, installed an inadequate phone system and fell weeks or months behind in making payments to day care providers.”[60] The Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS) asked MAXIMUS to meet improvement goals and by December, DSS Commissioner Joyce A. Thomas noted improvements on several fronts commenting, “The good news for Connecticut’s child care providers and the families we all serve is that the situation is rapidly improving. MAXIMUS has come a long way, and we are confident that current efforts are paving the way to long-term improvements.”[61]

    December 1998- The Sarasota Herald Tribune reported that the State of Florida had paid MAXIMUS $4.5 Million for a Child Support Recovery contract. MAXIMUS was only able to collect $162,000. “On average taxpayers paid MAXIMUS $25 for every 3 cents collected”.[62]

    April 2000- A New York judge ruled that MAXIMUS “misled” the city’s Human Resources Administration about the role a former senior policy adviser to Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani played in the company’s proposal for a welfare contract.[63] Six months later, in October 2000, the Appellate Division of New York State Supreme Court, unanimously overturned the lower court’s ruling, stating, “There was no evidence of favoritism…There was no evidence that Maximus was afforded unfair access.”[64]

    October 2000- Six state lawmakers in Wisconsin called for the termination of MAXIMUS’ W-2 contract, saying the firm has “broken faith with the state and poor people the agency serves in Milwaukee County.”[65]

    June 2001- The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported that two MAXIMUS employees filed discrimination complaints against the company. The employees stated that MAXIMUS is so lacking in diversity that the companies minority employees referred to it as “White Castle”.[66]

    July 2007- MAXIMUS settled a lawsuit brought against it by the United States government for involvement in falsifying Medicaid claims for $30.5 million.[67

  16. You’ve GOT to be kidding. That’s a new low for this board, congratulations. I went to the Wiki site and it’s hilarious what you chose to copy and paste vs what you omitted. Do you have something specific against Mr. Parker or do you have a more pathetic agenda?

  17. Is the city paying for his commuting expenses? Is he paid a car/fuel allowance or given a city vehicle? If the city is not paying his commuting expenses then the only question is if he is worth what he is being paid. So what are the details of his compensation?

  18. No. No agenda. I was on the way out the door and didn’t have any more time than that. Should have made more of an explanation. My apologies.

    But someone mentioned that no one really knew much about him. So I just googled the name of the company he had worked for. Popped right up. I cut and pasted the years for which he worked for the company. No personal guilt implied. For all we know, he was a whistle-blower. LOL. A lot of these large private consulting-national companies have had huge problems (remember KBR). A bit ethically-challenged. You would need to know more about the position he held and in what state. We’ll let Brad handle that one. He’s the reporter.

    But I did give my source. I don’t consider Wikipedia the best. But I hope others do read the entry in its entirety. Glad you bothered to do it.

  19. Lila, I think your post was right on point. The City was quick to use MAXIMUS as a high note when singing the praises if Mr. Parker. But, like suspected, they omitted some details. When a governmental agency starts something off with a coverup it’s likely to go downhill from there.

  20. Ya’ll are just out there in lala land. What coverup? The wiki site says Maximus has 7,500 employees and $929.6 million in revenue. It also is filled with plenty of praise. There is ONE section labeled “Criticisms”. In any company that big you’re going to have failures. I have been in a couple meetings with Mr. Parker and know one of his employees who has nothing but praise for the guy. If you can’t point to some objection to him I don’t know why you’re slinging so much mud.

  21. Look Mr. SMsince95 – you failed to mention that I didn’t post ALL of the criticisms. ROFL There were a whole bunch more than what I pasted in. I would encourage others to go take a look and think for themselves. Also – check out the footnotes. There is probably much more information out there. Good and bad.

  22. Just think what a vibrant economy we would have if the people that are already working in San Marcos decided to live in San Marcos. According to the SM Chamber of Commerce, Texas State employs 2,780, SMCISD employes 1,114 and the City of San Marcos employs 517. Granted some already live here and some are married to each other – but that adds up to 4,411 employees that are already coming into San Marcos five days per week. What can be done to get them to move here, buy a house, and make San Marcos their home town?

  23. Maybe the City could require them to at least lease an apartment in one of those many wonderful apt projects sprouting up around the City. Lol. Sorry. Couldn’t resist that one…

  24. Actually Ms. Knight, there were only 4 more critical citations and I assumed you omitted them because they are dated after Mr. Parker left Maximus. I also assume you have no specific criticism of Mr. Parker of any kind or you would have already mentioned it. As to requiring staff to live in the city, that would almost certainly drive up salaries as the supply of qualified folks willing to do that is smaller than the general pool. It’s a very simple supply and demand equation.

  25. Political hack jobs from people who, ironically, don’t live in San Marcos themselves. Don’t ya just love the internet?

  26. Actually it only limits the pool if the hiring is limited to those living in the city, requiring the employee to move to the city does not limit the pool.

    As for the time frame, actions in litigation when Mr. Parker was hired happened well before he went to work for Maximus, and don’t reflect on him at all.

  27. BS on limiting the pool. What if you have a paid for house in Kyle that you can’t sell? I could come up with a dozen examples of how being required to move to SM for a job would be a hardship.

  28. A hardship does not by itself limit the pool. The supply and demand argument only works if the search is limited. And it fails totally here because there was no search, Mr. Parker was promoted, there was no job posting.

  29. The problem is that there are valid, but conflicting issues here. A governmental employee may wish to reside outside the entity as it removes personal conflicts with their job. Perfectly valid argument. The taxpayer on the other hand may wish to see those spending their tax dollars to have a vested interest in those dollars exhibited by the employee residing within the entity. Also perfectly valid.

    Mr. Parker has made his decision. Taxpayers may have some questions about that decision.

  30. You just keep telling yourself that. My comments about requiring residency for certain positions is in response to comments by you and Mary suggesting that might be a good idea. They were not specific to Mr. Parker. The supply and demand argument is completely valid because the supply of qualified applicants willing to relocate to San Marcos is smaller than those that are not willing. Smaller supply equals less leverage from the demand side. Even setting aside salary increases, anything that would limit our ability to hire the BEST candidate would be idiotic.

  31. OK, which post of mine suggested residency was a requirement?

    I’ll save you the time; there isn’t one.

    Reading comprehension isn’t your strong suit SM.

  32. “The solution is very simple. Require that the employee, and their family, move within the confines of the governmental entity that they are employed by within a given time frame; six months to a year. Similar to the requirement for many governmental jobs that one gain certain certifications within a given time frame” – Nov. 25, 2012 9:55pm

  33. Game, set and march.

    The first supply & demand post, your first on this topic, 11/25, 1:51 AM. My first post, this topic, same day, but 1:03 PM. So the supply & demand issue could not be a response (unless your dog is Peabody)

    The post you quoted in no way says, or even suggests that I believe residency should be a requirement, it is a solution to your limited pool argument.

    Bye.

  34. The real question may be if this position is even needed at all? Growing the bureaucracy is the normal course of government at all levels. It really doesn’t matter where an employee lives unless the city is on the hook for extra costs incurred because of that. What case was made to justify this promotion based on the need for the position? ‘Sound Finances’ principles would seem to dictate a hard look at doing away with the position if a strong case cannot be made that it’s absolutely necessary.

  35. Intrepid said – “Wonder why it wasn’t mentioned in the report how long he has lived in San Marcos? Or where he does live?”

    and then said – “Really doesn’t matter to me if he lives in New York City as long as the taxpayers of San Marcos aren’t paying his commuting expenses. But, it’s curious that his residence location wasn’t mentioned in the release. It seems that it usually is in some way with executive hires. Seems especially curious since they named his wife and children but left out their place of residence. Because it was obviously a deliberate omission it makes me wonder what other interesting fact or facts may have been omitted.

    Brad, here’s a chance to do some real reporting. No more copying from the Texas Tribune and reposting city of SM ‘submitted report’ press releases.

    Dig up the dirt on this guy. Or prove him as clean as a hounds tooth. Just give us the real facts.”

    YOU’RE ALL OVER THE MAP! And why do you want to “dig up the dirt…” as if you can safely assume there’s dirt. Good lord, they guy is just trying to do his job and you’re trying to tar and feather him. Nobody ever once had anything specific to criticize him for. Let the poor guy alone.

  36. Intrepid, you hit the nail on the head. Does the City really need a(nother) assistant city manager? Will his duties change? Will his old position be refilled? What are his pet’s names? Does he like The Ramones? Lots of questions to be answered.

  37. Boxers or brief? If it’s OK to ask the POTUSA, it’s got to be OK for a SM ass’t city manager.

  38. This just in from CLUE-opedia ….

    Mr. Parker, commutes in from LA, he wears one blue and one red sock, Rey Bans blaring the Ramones on his iPhone…or is it an Android…

    But we don’t know if the shoes will exchanged on Friday due to “casual Friday.”

    County nepotism and generational seats on the P&Z …. that can’t at all be relevant to politics in San Marcos.

    Better get Brad out there on Friday to see if its Nike or Birkenstocks! Most importantly, better live feed it!

  39. SM, you are way too protective and sensitive to anything said about Parker. My whole point all along is that too many pertinent details seem to have been obfuscated in this story. The question that seems to so easily fly over your head is why was it left out of the original press release where Parker lives.

    A news mans job, is to get facts and dig up dirt if there is any or to prove him clean if he is. I never said there was dirt but there are questions. Questions you seem to fear being asked.

  40. LMC, in all your joking you do have a point or two. But, I’m not sure you realize it. There are a lot of serious issues, like nepotism at the county, that go unchecked simply because we have nobody with enough interest to ask the questions that need to be asked.

  41. Almost all “news” is generated by someone other than the newspaper (including this “submitted report.” Nobody is investigating or reporting anything in San Marcos.

  42. Intrepid, I think your expectations are too high for a free news source that runs on almost no staff. Ommissions from the original story did not fly over my head, I just found them not all that relevant. I’d much rather have Brad spend his time on Cape’s Camp than on the salary history and residency of our middle managers. It sounds to me like you don’t know the guy, don’t know what he does but are ready to lynch him on an innuendo. I wonder if you’d like your employer to do a colonoscopy on your entire life’s history?

  43. What is still going unrecognized is when you have no idea at all about the city staff and how they conduct business, why, how and with whom their real loyalties lie you will never get truthful answers ahoy the issues you do care about. Good luck in finding out any truthful answers about Capes camp.

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