San Marcos Mercury | Local News from San Marcos and Hays County, Texas
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SUBMITTED REPORT

The San Marcos Water/Wastewater Utility has reported an overflow of an estimated 800,000 gallons of domestic wastewater diluted with rainwater into the San Marcos River following nearly five inches of rain within a four hour period overnight.

The overflow occurred from the city’s wastewater collection system just outside the main lift station, located at 502 River Road. The discharge began around 7 a.m. and continued until about 1:25 p.m, with an estimated volume of approximately 800,000 gallons, according to Jon Clack, Assistant Director of Public Services.

The area potentially affected by the discharge would be the San Marcos River downstream of the Interstate 35 bridge across the river.

“The discharge consisted largely of rainwater which had infiltrated the system and was further diluted by very high river flows.  We do not believe the overflow will have any negative environmental impact,” Clack said. City crews have begun clean up of the overflow area.

Under the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality rules, the City of San Marcos is required to notify area news media, local government officials and TCEQ about any accidental discharge of untreated wastewater of more than 100,000 gallons.

“The city of San Marcos is committed to meeting all regulations and to operating the wastewater collection system in an environmentally responsive manner,” Clack said.

For more information, contact Jon Clack at 512-393-8010.

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3 thoughts on “Downpour spills sewage into San Marcos River

  1. “The city of San Marcos is committed to meeting all regulations and to operating the wastewater collection system in an environmentally responsive manner,” Clack said.

    A few things are missing here. One is the Why did it happen? The other is How you are going to keep it from happening in the future? The last is the committment.

  2. I also don’t understand why this happened. We’ve ALWAYS known that we that we will get rains as big and fast as this one (and bigger), every so often. Have the engineers screwed up in their planning? Have we not built our infrastructure correctly to deal with what we have always known that nature will bring us? What is the problem here? Who is responsible?
    I bet that someone local knows the story of this failure.

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